default-avatar
emre aydın

In ways I wouldn't expect

A man who had a car accident says:"It shook me up pretty good... in ways I wouldn't expect."(Nashville)Does "in ways" have the same meaning as "in a way", especially in everyday language? Or do you think he may be referring to more than one way?Thanks for your help. 

3 answers answer to the question In ways I wouldn't expect

default-avatar
The Newt updated 22 December
If by "in a way" you mean "sort of / kind of," no, this is different. "In ways" here means " in (certain) manners." 
default-avatar
emre aydın updated 22 December
The Newt said:↑
If by "in a way" you mean "sort of / kind of," no, this is different. "In ways" here means " in (certain) manners."Click to expand...
No, I didn't mean "sort of/kinda". "In a way I wouldn't expect" sounds me better, so I wanted to learn if they are used instead of each other but I think they're not.Thank you.(By the way, I think the "manner" you meant may not be used as a plural noun. Can we use it with -S suffix? Here it is: Manner - Definition for English-Language Learners from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary) 
default-avatar
The Newt updated 22 December
Emre aydın said:↑
No, I didn't mean "sort of/kinda"."In a way I wouldn't expect" sounds me better, so I wanted to learn if they are used instead of each other but I think they're not.Thank you.(By the way, I think the "manner" you meant may not be used as a plural noun. Can we use it with -S suffix? Here it is: Manner - Definition for English-Language Learners from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary)Click to expand...
"In a way is simply the singular form of the same. Here there are multiple ways. We rarely use the plural "manners" in the way I did above, but I needed a plural synonym for "ways." 
Leave a reply